The Academic Minute: Science Meets Poetry

On Saturday, Anna was featured on The Academic Minute, an NPR show out of WAMC that airs on stations nationwide, mostly in university towns. Her subject was the intersection of science and poetry. What’s great is that her segment–both audio and transcript–are now in the archives at The Academic Minute, and the page also includes tidbits about some of Anna’s poems that incorporate scientific terminology … Continue reading The Academic Minute: Science Meets Poetry

On Traveling: NASM & Other Serendipity

Last week, we were back at the University of Maryland. We lived in College Park, Maryland, in the early 1990s while Anna was earning her MFA and working at the Entomological Society of America and Doug was working for NASA at the Center for AeroSpace Information as an abstractor and indexer. The University of Maryland and the surrounding communities have changed in twenty years, with … Continue reading On Traveling: NASM & Other Serendipity

Santa Fe Retreat: Judy Chicago

We spent eleven days in Santa Fe on our self-designed writing retreat. Take a look at PART 1 and PART 2. Shortly after we arrived in Santa Fe, Anna leafed through a free tabloid and discovered that the visual artist Judy Chicago was giving a gallery talk at the opening of her new show at the David Richard Gallery. Anna had first come across Chicago’s … Continue reading Santa Fe Retreat: Judy Chicago

Santa Fe Retreat (2)

Recently, we spent eleven days in Santa Fe on our very own self-made writing retreat. Writing was our goal, but we also recommend Santa Fe as a great getaway even if getting away from your routine is your only goal. You can read about lodging, food, and shopping in our first Santa Fe Retreat post. But wait, there’s more! MUSEUMS & GALLERIES Santa Fe is a hub … Continue reading Santa Fe Retreat (2)

Yerkes Observatory (Photos!)

This past weekend, we visited Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, near where we each vacationed as children, long before we knew each other. This University of Chicago observatory was funded by Charles Tyson Yerkes, but the 40-inch refracting telescope and the building that houses it are the result of George Ellery Hale’s first grand vision to build the largest telescope in the world. If … Continue reading Yerkes Observatory (Photos!)

Writing Process Blog Hop (Anna)

NOTE: Anna also has a recent piece at The Huffington Post about writers’ schedules. Read that by clicking HERE. We’ve participated in a blog hop before, and we were happy to be tagged for a new one—twice. Because we’ve been tagged by two different writers, we’re doing two different posts as part of My Writing Process, one today and the other, next Wednesday. While we write together a lot, … Continue reading Writing Process Blog Hop (Anna)

The Lunar Eclipse, Apollo 11, & Apollo 16

On Monday evening, we stayed up a little late to catch the lunar eclipse. We popped outside, watched for a few minutes as it began. We went outside again twenty or thirty minutes later to watch it again. And then again, and so on. Anna looked up the word umbra, which comes from a Latin word that means shadow or to be in the shade. … Continue reading The Lunar Eclipse, Apollo 11, & Apollo 16

Space Probes

While the word probe is used conversationally to mean to examine physically or refers to an instrument designed for that sort of physical examination, the word probe comes from a Latin word meaning to test or the result of such a test, proof. Today, we celebrate both senses of this word and the spacecraft that embody both meanings, that carry out our examination and testing … Continue reading Space Probes

Happy Birthday Copernicus & Kerwin! And Belated to Galileo!

On this date in 1473, Nicolaus Copernicus was born in Poland. Just before his death more than seventy years later, his book On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres (also called On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Bodies) changed the trajectory of science. Copernicus asserted that Earth is not the center of our Solar System and, instead, that the planets orbit around the relatively stationary … Continue reading Happy Birthday Copernicus & Kerwin! And Belated to Galileo!

Apollo 8: The 45th Anniversary

Forty-five years ago, a spacecraft with human beings in it was circling the Moon for the first time. In December 1968, for the first time, people on Earth saw a view their own planet in its entirety from space. Forty-five years before that, sound barrier-breaking test pilot Chuck Yeager, Mercury-Gemini-Apollo astronaut Wally Schirra, and first American in space Alan Shepard were born. Just ten years before … Continue reading Apollo 8: The 45th Anniversary